12 May 2017

Visiting Charles Brandon’s Tomb in St George’s Chapel at Windsor Castle


I’d always wanted to visit St George’s Chapel at Windsor Castle. When researching for my current work in progress, (about Henry VII’s daughter Mary Tudor), I realised Charles Brandon’s tomb is there so I decided to visit and take a look at it.

St George’s Chapel is within the grounds of Windsor Castle and was founded by King Edward III. Many successive royals have made their own ‘improvements’ and the chapel was seriously damaged by looters during the English Civil War.

There is a real sense of being at the heart of English History as you enter, as it is the spiritual home of the Order of the Garter and burial place of many kings. I spotted the portcullis badge of Margaret Beaufort everywhere, as well as the Dragon and Greyhound of King Henry VII.

The chapel is also full of surprises. I found I was looking at the tomb of King Edward IV, buried with ‘Elizabeth Widvile’.  The tomb had been ‘lost’ then rediscovered during restoration work in 1789, which explains its modern appearance. (When the tomb was found many ‘relics’ were taken, including locks of Edward's hair – and liquid from the bottom of the coffin!)

I was listening to the audio tour as I entered the quire and was amazed when I was asked to look up to the left of the altar. That morning I’d been writing about Catherine of Aragon watching Henry VIII’s jousting from an ornate wooden gallery. There above me was another - the wooden gallery from where Queen Catherine would sit to watch services in the chapel, as well preserved as if she was expected to arrive at any moment.

Henry VIII’s tomb occupies the middle of the quire and is surprising both for its simplicity and the company we’ve chosen for him to keep in eternity – as well as Jane Seymour, Henry is buried with the beheaded body of King Charles Ist and a stillborn son of Queen Anne. (If you’d like to know what Henry’s tomb was supposed to be like, there is a useful post here.)

Having failed to find the tomb of Charles Brandon, I sked a guide and discovered it in the south transit, half covered by a wooden bench seat and under a life-sized portrait of King Edward III adjacent to the tomb of King Henry VI.  Interestingly, it refers to Mary Tudor as ‘Married Mary daughter of Henry VII, Widow of Louis XII King of France.


And what about Mary Tudor’s tomb? She died in Suffolk on 25 June 1533 and Charles Brandon paid for a fine tomb Bury St Edmunds Abbey. When the abbey was destroyed during the Dissolution of the Monasteries, her remains were taken to St. Mary’s Church, also in Bury St Edmunds, and placed under a modest slab – another long trip from Wales!

Tony Riches

12 comments:

  1. I cried when I knelt at Brandon's grave. I have some beautiful photos xx

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    1. The whole place is totally surreal and it takes quite an effort not to be overcome by so much history...

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  2. Thanks for the interesting post! I do think I spotted an error- Edward the Confessor was an Anglo Saxon king. The timeline doesn't seem to match up.

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    1. Oops I meant Edward the third - thanks Sara :)

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  3. Yeah, Edward the Confessor died a few centuries prior to the 13th Century.

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    1. yes 1066 - it was Westminster Abbey he founded

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  4. There's a bench half covering Charles Brandon's tomb?

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    1. Yes you can see it in the photo above - I pushed it as far back as I could but Brandon would not have been impressed...

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    2. That seems rather disrespectful.

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    3. When I visited I picked the whole bench up and moved it!! I wasn't having a bench over Brandon's grave!

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    4. I will speak to the chapel staff about it next time I'm there!

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  5. listening to the boys choir there is an amazing experience. Almost made me religious.

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